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Venice Museums Hit by Floods

 

Water is life, but then again water can take away life: in it lies the power to give or take in cases where there is an overflow of a large amount of it beyond its normal limits especially over what is normally dry land. This is normally what we refer to as floods. Floods have been in existence for like forever and the damages they bring along is huge among them being destruction of property, forces people to move from their residences, loss of lives and many others.

Venice is a city in Italy built on more than 100 small islands and has been dubbed as a “floating city” for years now. Floods have been “normal” in the city but a few days ago they became out of hand as an unusually high tide submerged most parts of it leading to massive damage of property. Among the businesses and institutions that were affected were the Venice’s museums resulting into a temporary shutting of their doors. The floods which hit 75% of the city caused the water levels to rise more than five feet and are said to have been the worst to ever happen in a decade.

 

The Peggy Guggenheim Foundation was among the museums that were forced to temporarily close down on 29th October but the tide did not affect its interiors. It is one of the most perfectly formed galleries in the world and due to its prime position it closed down due to the high tides.  The Prada Foundation also closed down for a few hours due to the floods. The Architecture Biennale was also closed but the venues were not affected with 3,000 visitors turning up. The popular Piazza San Marco, home to the art-filled Basilica di San Marco and Doge’s palace as well as the Museo Correr also closed down.

Meanwhile, it is not known whether the Fondazione Musei Civici Veneziani, the foundation established by the Comune di Venezia city authority had any of its institutions closed down due to the adverse weather conditions. Special walkways were erected outside Doge’s Palace in St Mark’s Square on 30 October enabling visitors to enter the 15th-century structure.

The museums have however reopened and normalcy is slowly picking up with visitors streaming in them. Officials of the museums hope that action will be taken to control such floods which are badly affecting them. Studies have shown that Venice is naturally sinking- a phenomenon that makes the city prone to flooding, however it is such a historic and beautiful city, the future of its landmarks whether great or small are of concern.

 

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