Home / Art Trends / Cold War Era Soviet Penitentiary Is Being Transformed Into An Art Hub

Cold War Era Soviet Penitentiary Is Being Transformed Into An Art Hub

 

penetentiaryTallinn, Estonia – Tuesday February 18, 2014

Marina Andrijčić-Ojeda and Catarina Ferreira are the artists and co-founders of The Penitentiary, a collaborative site-specific art exhibition to take place in abandoned war-era prisons throughout Eastern Europe.  They will operate a series of independent projects to transform each prison’s standing structure and explore its personal history by extending the use and availability of unrestricted public art.

prisonIt is a very ambitious project, and they will include varying types of art in the exhibit.

“The Battery Project” will take place at Soviet-era Patarei Prison in Tallinn, Estonia during the upcoming summer months. A portion of the prison will be dedicated to a consistent rotation of art exhibitions during this three month period, starting in May.

prison2The point of the exhibition is to address the issues of wrongful imprisonment and the deliberate suppression of a regime, and an excellent venue to demonstrate that than an abandoned prison. Through the domain of historical structure, we are connecting most closely to these theories by using the very result of its presence, says the founders. (Source)

prison3Artists will each pay tribute to the space by reflecting on its history through the use of their own style. This will progress as the artists spend more time in the prison and experience the space firsthand.

The project is extremely inspired by Patarei’s rich history, and the content is amplified by Estonia’s struggle for independence. Tallinn has an incredible art scene that they are planning on tapping into.

They’re inviting the community of Tallinn to view and interact with the art displayed.

“We’re hoping to transform Patarei into a temple in which one can resolve personal yet universal conflicts. Where one can embrace the darker history, and react in a positive light. We’re also inviting the International community to participate, as we will be live-streaming all performances and events.” – M & C

They raised over ten grand on kickstarter, drawing from 126 backers to fund the project.

“During The Battery Project we will install our own work while curating that of other artists worldwide to show alongside us. Artworks will span various mediums and occupy the abandoned, open spaces Patarei lends to us. Additionally, we will host performances, lectures, screenings, and dinners. We wish to invite the community and artists alike in re-introducing Patarei as a venue for creative response through fine art.”

Prison adventure is a 3-hour program during which the Patarei visitor follows every procedure of someone being incarcerated (fingerprints, photography etc.) followed by a tour and meal with a small schnapps. Price EUR 40 per person.

Culture Park Patarei presents the history of Patarei sea fortress-prison and also carries out various events throughout the year.

History

In 1828 Nicholas I of Russia mandated the building of the sea fortress of Patarei. Completed in 1840, it is located on area of 4 hectares (10 acres). Over the years it has had different functions – in 1867 functioning as barracks, in 1920 as a prison and since 2007 as a Culture Park.

This unique 19th century example of Tallinn’s top architecture has now in the 21st century changed from a longtime symbol of repressions to a favorite place for residents of the nation’s capital and visitors, a multifunctional place to spend free time.

the-battery-project-image

We’re hoping to transform Patarei into a temple in which one can resolve personal yet universal conflicts. Where one can embrace the darker history, and react in a positive light. We’re also inviting the International community to participate, as we will be live-streaming all performances and events.

“Under this title, we will operate a series of independent projects to transform each prison’s standing structure and explore its personal history by extending the use and availability of unrestricted public art. “The Battery Project” will be the first of this series, and will take place at Soviet-era Patarei Prison in Tallinn, Estonia during the upcoming summer months. A portion of the prison will be dedicated to a consistent rotation of art exhibitions during this three month period.

During The Battery Project we will install our own work while curating that of other artists worldwide to show alongside us. Artworks will span various mediums and occupy the abandoned, open spaces Patarei lends to us. Additionally, we will host performances, lectures, screenings, and dinners. We wish to invite the community and artists alike in re-introducing Patarei as a venue for creative response through fine art.”

 Written by Andrew Kaminski

 

 

About Andrew Kaminski

Andrew Kaminski
Andrew Kaminski is a NYC based artist, is currently collaborating with Zest Collective choreographer and Julliard graduate, Gentry George, on an audiovisual dance project. He has shown color pencil drawings along with live video art performance at the New Century Artist's Gallery in Chelsea, NY, and he has executed a live video art projection at the Marquee in Chelsea, in Manhattan, NY. He is currently showing at the Harlem Arts Festival at the end of June.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *